A 120m-long replica of 17th century London will be floated down the Thames and set alight as the finale to a festival marking 350 years since The Great Fire Of London .

The sculpture, currently under construction at Royal Docks has been designed by American artist David Best and aims to tell the story of city-shaping blaze of 1666.

The fire, between Blackfriars Bridge and Waterloo, will be the culmination of six days of free art installations across London between Tuesday, August 30 and Sunday, September 4.

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These will include Fires Ancient and Fires Modern, two displays either side of the Thames.

The former will light up the south and east sides of the dome of St Paul’s Cathedral with fiery projections echoing the impact of the fire on the cathedral.

The latter will be projected onto the fly tower of The National Theatre and will reveal stories of how the city recovered and became what it is today.

Another highlight will be a domino exhibit set up in the City, which will see 23,000 breeze blocks toppling as they trace the path of the fire through the streets at 6.30pm on Saturday, September 3.

Entry for the London 1666 burning sculpture on The Thames begins at 6pm on Sunday, September 4.

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London's Burning festival schedule

Of All The People In The World, Stan’s Cafe, Inner Temple

Tuesday, August 30 - Sunday, September 4

12-6pm weekdays and 12-8pm weekend

From the handful of recorded deaths to the tens of thousands made homeless in 1666, Of All The People In The World will count the cost of the Fire in grains of rice comparing historical facts with contemporary moments.

Fire Garden, Compagnie Carabosse, Tate Modern riverside

Thursday, September 1 -Saturday, September 3

8-11pm

With views across to the City and St Paul’s Cathedral, French fire alchemists will transform the riverside area in front of Tate Modern into a crackling, spitting, after-dark adventure.

Fires Of London (Fires Ancient and Fires Modern), St Paul’s Cathedral dome and National Theatre fly tower

Thursday, September 1 - Sunday, September 4

Dusk-11pm

Fires Ancient will light up the south and east sides of the dome of St Paul’s Cathedral with a fiery projection echoing both the catastrophic impact of the Great Fire of London on the Cathedral itself and the birth of the building designed by Christopher Wren that emerged from the ashes. Fires Modern will be projected onto the fly tower of the National Theatre and will reveal stories of resurgence and change that have shaped London.

Holoscenes Early Morning Opera, Exchange Square, Broadgate Exchange Square

Thursday, September 1 - Sunday, September 4

5pm-10pm

Broadgate will see the UK Premiere of Holoscenes, a six-­hour underwater performance ­installation by US­ based Early Morning Opera.

Dominoes, Station House Opera, City of London

Saturday, September 3

6.30pm

Involving 600 volunteers, 23,000 breeze blocks and a 5.5km run through the city, Dominoes will trace the paths of the fire through the streets, buildings and public spaces, linking the past with the present in a symbolic and physical chain of cause and effect.

London 1666, David Best and Artichoke, River Thames

Sunday, September 4

Entry from 6pm

This spectacular finale will see an extraordinary 120­m-long sculpture of 17th ­century London floated onto the Thames and sat alight between Blackfriars Bridge and Waterloo in a dramatic retelling of the story of the Great Fire.

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