A trip on the DLR from Canary Wharf to Beckton is like a tour of a building site – cranes rise up

Royal Wharf, Albert Dock, across the water at Knights Dragon, in the environs of the Excel – buildings are flying up.

There are there to meet a pent-up demand but, in London in particular, the sheer pace of development is failing to keep pace with population growth.

The population of parts of England has risen seven and a half times faster than the rate of new housing over the last decade.

Exclusive analysis of official data shows that the problem is worst in Barking and Dagenham. The number of people living in the east London borough rose by 32,684 between 2004 and 2014. At the same time, the net number of new homes in the area rose by just 4,290 in the decade to March 2015.

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That means there are 7.6 extra people in Barking and Dagenham for every one extra home.

Using that figure – extra people per extra homes – puts Newham in the top 10 and Greenwich in the top 20. London and the south dominates the list.

At the other end of the scale, a number of places have seen their populations fall while still building extra housing stock.

Barrow-in-Furness, for example, now has 3,197 fewer residents – but 570 extra dwellings.

Areas where the housing crisis is greatest

Authority / net new homes available 2004-15 / population change 2004-14 / extra people per extra home

Barking and Dagenham / 4290 / 32684 / 7.6

Redbridge / 6460 / 44281 / 6.9

Luton UA / 4070 / 27399 / 6.7

Kingston upon Thames / 3000 / 18903 / 6.3

Hillingdon / 7150 / 43999 / 6.2

Merton / 2380 / 14607 / 6.1

Waltham Forest / 7330 / 43018 / 5.9

Newham / 12010 / 69888 / 5.8

Enfield / 7470 / 42357 / 5.7

Sutton / 3190 / 17040 / 5.3

Brighton and Hove UA / 5870 / 31229 / 5.3

Oldham / 1950 / 9777 / 5.0

Guildford / 3000 / 14383 / 4.8

Greenwich / 8690 / 41488 / 4.8

Brent / 11140 / 52427 / 4.7