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Limehouse Cut to be adopted by local organisations

London’s oldest canal, dating back to 1766, is handed over to the community groups who will be given the chance to shape its future

Jeannette Brooks, Canal And River Trust, and Dermot O'Brien, Poplar Harca, by the Limehouse Cut

The entire length of the historic Limehouse Cut has been adopted by a group of local organisations who will get the chance to shape the waterway’s future for the community.

The 19 groups, led by Poplar Harca, have taken advantage of the Canal And River Trust's scheme that gives communities the chance to get involved in activities from improving wildlife habitats or towpath clean-ups to helping run educational events.

The group are informally called the Super Adoption Stakeholders (Sass) and is the largest adoption group in the country.

Babu Bhattacherjee, Poplar Harca’s director of communities and neighbourhoods, said: “It is very forward thinking of the Canal And River Trust to encourage interested groups to drive the regeneration of Limehouse Cut forward in partnership.

“The group has four key themes; education, environment, sport and commercial development. We will have tremendous volunteering opportunities for local residents and especially young people.

“We are working to develop paddle sports on the canal and already have linkages so young people can progress their sport to the highest level. Poplar HARCA is incredibly excited about the potential of this initiative for our local community.”

The Limehouse Cut is London’s oldest canal, dating back to 1766 and stretches from Limehouse Basin to Three Mills in Bow, totalling more than three miles.

Sass’s role will formally start in September, initially offering activities a couple of times a month.

Canal And River Trust development and engagement manager Jeannette Brooks said: “We’re delighted Sass have adopted the Limehouse Cut.

The canals and rivers in London are thriving at the moment but the Cut is perhaps one of the lesser known and less-loved sections.

“In the last year or so we’ve started to see more and more groups use and help improve the water space. The adoption will accelerate this ongoing revival no end.

“We know from other areas that have been adopted the huge benefits of having people take ownership of their local canal, and we can’t wait to see the diverse activities within the adoption action plan get started.”

Groups involved

Poplar Harca, Active 360, Moo Canoes, Tryangle CIC, Watertrek, Ldn Youth Rowing, British Dragonboat Association, House Mill, Docklands Sailing & Watersports Centre, Queen Mary University, Lee And Stort Boat Company, Thames 21, 4th Polar Scouts, 2nd E Ldn Scouts, Bow Boat Company, Watertex, London Legacy Development Corporation, Leaside Planning, Ldn W/ways Projects

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