The City of Westminster is the least working class city in England and Wales according to government data.

An exclusive analysis by The Wharf has revealed that only a fraction of the people who live in the city are engaged in the routine and semi-routine jobs usually associated with the working classes.

Only 21,164 of the city’s 175,505 working-age inhabitants (12.1 per cent) do routine work as their main occupation according to the 2011 census.

No other city in England and Wales had a lower proportion of people in these roles.

Surprisingly, London as a whole was also one of the least working class cities in England and Wales with just 17.8 per cent of the working population in working class jobs.

10 Least Working Class Cities

The Wharf

Stoke-on-Trent was the most working-class city out of the 50 included in the analysis with 37.5% of the working population engaged in employment associated with the working classes. Next was Hull on 36.7% while Wakefield was third with 35.4%.

All these figures were taken from the National Statistics socio-economic classification (NS-sec) figures from the 2011 census.

Across the whole of England and Wales 25.2% of the population were employed in a routine or semi-routine job as of 2011.

This includes routine work across all kinds of different disciplines such as childcare, production and agriculture.

10 LEAST WORKING CLASS CITIES

City/Major Town // All People // Number in routine and semi-routine // % in routine and semi-routine

Westminster // 175,505 // 21,164 // 12.1%

St Albans // 99,863 // 13,835 // 13.9%

Cambridge // 98,283 // 14,688 // 14.9%

Winchester // 84,495 // 13,630 // 16.1%

Brighton and Hove // 210,792 // 36,012 // 17.1%

Oxford // 118,437 // 20,352 // 17.2%

London // 6,117,482 // 1,087,713 // 17.8%

Tunbridge Wells // 82,052 // 16,096 // 19.6%

Chelmsford // 123,693 // 25,018 // 20.2%

Chichester // 81,037 // 16,557 // 20.4%