Gig review: Taylor Swift at The O2

By Beth Allcock on February 5, 2014 10:05 AM |

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ENTERTAINMENT

Taylor Swift, Red Tour
The O2
★★★★✩

I'm beginning to think Taylor Swift is a whole lot misunderstood.

"You'll be the oldest girls there," laughed my housemate, after my pal and I excitedly told her of last night's trip to The O2.

And yes, although we found ourselves sat in the rafters among pre-teens wrapped up in fairy lights, donning tops splashed with the American's face and glitter glow sticks, this was far from a night out dedicated to the kids.

As if to justify the point, The Script frontman Danny O'Donoghue, made a brief appearance for a duet on his track Break Even, to the delight of the contingent of females in their twenties and thirties in our row.

But what became crystal clear as the 24-year-old opened up both her back-catalogue and heart to the sell-out crowd was the catchy yet sincere nature of her chart-topping creations.

Anyone who has or is suffering from a failed relationship can chant the lyrics of We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together - in what is, admittedly, a pretty fun form of stress relief - or feel a twinge of romanticism in Taylor's early hit, Love Story.

Opening with Red album tracks State of Grace followed by Holy Ground, the Grammy Award winner was visibly touched at the crowd's elated reaction.

And throughout her two-hour set, before album headliner Red, heartfelt Ours and new offering All Too Well, she showed sophistication beyond her years, letting the audience into her song-writing secrets, pain and heartbreak behind her tunes.

And when things got lively, she showed she's no one-trick country pony, adding sultry-ness and Sixties sass to You Belong With Me and a urban edge to Love Story.

"I don't know about you - I'm feeling 22," she sings mid-set.

And us? Yes, we're post-teenagers, but we were jumping and singing our hearts out like the best of them.

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